Deaths involving covid-19

Wednesday 13 May 2020

Commenting on the latest release of covid-related deaths across Scotland, Inverclyde Council Leader, Councillor Stephen McCabe, said: “It is welcome news that the latest covid-related deaths for Inverclyde is showing a steady reduction.  While our area continues to be sitting at a higher level than other areas the reduction this week may be the one positive we have but it is no cause for celebration. 

Until  there are no more reported cases consistently in our area and across the country each of us must continue to do all we can to protect our community from the worst effects of the virus .  Every single death, whether covid-related or from other reasons, is a personal tragedy touching our community and none of us should become complacent until we are free of this awful virus.

“Media reports and the more detailed analysis from the National Records of Scotland are highlighting a strong link between deprivation and levels of deaths by covid-19.  While we have been talking about the need for more analysis of this link for some weeks now the clear link now must be taken seriously to ensure that public policy interventions are directed to areas and communities of greatest need as part of our recovery.

"That recovery cannot be business as usual and must take clear account of the lessons learned from this virus and the devastation it has caused to communities and to address the underlying issues it has exploited.

“As individuals right now we can support each other by following the physical and social distancing guidance and the stay at home rules.  These are difficult for many of us and the restrictions will come at a cost.  The job you are doing is saving lives and right now we all need to make sure we concentrate on that goal of no more covid-related deaths."

The latest covid-related deaths in Inverclyde show that there have been 103 in total, an increase of four from last week.  Death per 10,000 in Inverclyde continues to be higher than all other areas of Scotland at 13 per 10,000.

Page last updated: 14 May 2020